scienceisbeauty

scienceisbeauty:

Intriguing. Take a look inside of the Whale Warehouse, you’ll see thousands of specimens that are too big to fit on the shelves in the museum’s Mammalogy Department of the The Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County. A point macabre, but at least you can see it in an odors free environment.

Produced by Grant Slater and Mae Ryan from 89.3 KPCC (Southern California Public Radio)

More info.- The Whale Warehouse (and also in Tumblr)

brookhavenlab
brookhavenlab:


These psychedelic hues show off a major scientific tool that helps expose the nanoscale structure of an endless array of materials: x-ray scattering.
High-frequency x-rays from our National Synchrotron Light Source strike a material and bounce off of individual molecules and atoms, and sensitive detectors record the changes in the x-rays’ energy and direction. Using complex mathematical models, scientists use these scattered x-ray points to determine the otherwise imperceptible nanoscale details.
It may be hard to believe, but this stunning, wide-angle x-ray scattering image revealed the crystallization of an organic material that could be used in the next generation of solar cells.

brookhavenlab:

These psychedelic hues show off a major scientific tool that helps expose the nanoscale structure of an endless array of materials: x-ray scattering.

High-frequency x-rays from our National Synchrotron Light Source strike a material and bounce off of individual molecules and atoms, and sensitive detectors record the changes in the x-rays’ energy and direction. Using complex mathematical models, scientists use these scattered x-ray points to determine the otherwise imperceptible nanoscale details.

It may be hard to believe, but this stunning, wide-angle x-ray scattering image revealed the crystallization of an organic material that could be used in the next generation of solar cells.